Saturday, December 18, 2010

Art that Empowers Girls

Did you know that studies investigating gender roles say that despite recent changes in media, rigid stereotyping for young girls still exists. It's true.

Advertising, cartoons, commercials, picture books and toys are just some of the ways that children develop an understanding about how society defines what is means to be a girl or a boy. Most often, girls are represented as being motivated by love and romance, and are less independent than boys. Experts in the the field confirm that many themes portray girls as sexual yet powerless and passive. What confusing messages!

When looking at the posters above, girls (and boys) can learn that gender roles are not rigid. The artist, Amanda Visell has had her work featured in galleries, museums, toys stores and even movies around the world. I think she's a maverick!

I love the message in this art. Don't you?


21 comments:

Ami said...

Love the message... but don't love the actual art.

OHN said...

It's so funny that I was talking with a friend not long ago about this topic. We both agreed that had we been born 20 years later our lives (careers) would have been much different.

We were only encouraged to be teachers, nurses or housewives. Not that there is anything wrong with any of them, it is just a pretty short list :)

Xmichra said...

I try not to push, and curb what I can. If my daughters want to be homemakers or nurses, I think that is just as well as being race car drivers or astronauts.

I have a picture of my eldest when she was three, in a mud puddle, wearing full on princess gear, playing with a dump truck. I made that one a staple, and an 8x10 so she can be reminded that she can be whatever she wants... and being a princess is okay too :)

Wanda's Wings said...

Great message.

Faith A. said...

Love Love Love this. Such an important message. I have been doing a lot of writing about this lately and was so glad to read your post and see the artwork.

S'onnie said...

Its a fantastic message. I know when I was teaching I always encouraged both genders to give everythhing a go. I love Babette Cole as a childrens author as she took many of the traditional fairy tales and spun them around by changing the gender of the main character

I hope you have a Merry Christmas and a happy new year


Kia Kaha

onelongjourney said...

Love the message and love the art. Made me think of Maurice Sendak. I think that my teenage daughter believes all these things about herself and thinks she can do anything. So different than I was and am.

Thanks for sharing these.

lostinamaze said...

I had this discussion recently about a laundry ad I have seen on television.

I think art is a great visual way to get this message across.

Annmarie said...

Cool. Would be nice to show every race in the illustrations.

TK Kerouac said...

I need to start deprogramming my 12 year old granddaughter

kenju said...

I try to give those messages to my four granddaughters.

Thanks so much for the visit and the lovely comments. Merry Christmas!

Dr. Deb said...

Seems like all of you love the message in the art! It's so great that we can give girls more empowering options.

mrwriteon said...

So, you're saying it's not all about unicorns. But seriously, definitely food for thought.

Sarah G. said...

Yes. This is great. Thanks for sharing.

purple cupcakes said...

I the mixed messages still go and are alive.

Merry xmas to you and your family thankyou for your best wishes to us. We are now falt out with work that getting to blogs seems extremely hard. but we do appreciate all of your support throguht the year.

Richard said...

Hey you don't have to publish this. You visited my blog, which is kind of pretty strange, since I'm sure you're one of the only two readers I know who visit my blog without actually being accidentally redirected to it by blogger. so i guess I meant this to be a thank you. If you feel there's some good commercial things you can exchange with me, feel free to do so. More strength for your medical blog.

Casdok said...

Definetly!!
Happy christmas 8)

Xmichra said...

Just stopping in to wish you a merry holiday Deb :)

ellesu said...

My daughter was always free of stereotypes - even while I tried to fit her into them. At the time, I didn't think anything about it - and, having 3 sons I thought I deserved to buy frilly stuff for a change. My daughter soon set me straight. She taught me who she was. We learned together, and she's still teaching me. I am glad that she lives in a world where she has more opportunity and choices than women once had.

Holiday blessing to you and yours!

Tery Lynne said...

Totally agree!

lightfeather said...

Absolutely LOVE it!